Archive for the ‘pre&others’-views’ Category


The Art Spirit

March 6th, 2013

“When the artist is alive in any person, whatever his kind of work may be, he becomes an inventive, searching, daring, self-expressive creature. He becomes interesting to other people. He disturbs, upsets, enlightens, and opens ways for a better understanding. Where those who are not artists are trying to close the book, he opens it and shows there are still more pages possible.” Robert Henri –  The Art Spirit, 1923

Creativity requires time

February 22nd, 2013
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Young-ha Kim: Be an artist, right now! (TED)

February 20th, 2013

Book Review

February 19th, 2013

The Apple Tree: Raising 5 Kids with Disabilities and Remaining Sane

by Linda Petersen

The six-week-old infant boy, with gorgeous blue sparkling eyes and blonde hair does not make eye contact with his mother who is trying to nurse him because he cannot see. The five-month-old infant girl from Guatemala with happy brown eyes smiles easily, but cannot hear the voice of her mother. The six-year-old boy with dark skin and gorgeous black curls hides behind a large, fake plant rather than join his family at the table for Christmas dinner. The Hispanic boy’s joyful smile at his mother turns to a smoldering stare, holding the darkness within him. The seven-year-old girl with beautiful blue eyes and blonde hair, does not love her mother, and tells her so every chance she gets. She tells her in American Sign Language.
Are these snapshots of five troubled families?

apple tree
No, these are the children of my family. My name is Linda Petersen. My husband RAYMOND and I have five children with five different disabilities. Our first son Francis was born blind and we later found that I carried the same gene that had left my brother blind, deaf and multiply disabled. So we adopted our second child, Dinora. Declared healthy, she turned out to be malnourished and deaf and suffering from attention deficit, post traumatic stress and anxiety disorders.
Still we coped. I worked part time and drove my pair to numerous medical and school appointments, while Raymond pitched in admirably on housework and cooking.
But when Francis and Dinora became teenagers and my schedule eased, I ached to do more. Raising children was great fun and I had the time, emotions and ability to give. Raymond adored children, so our only dilemma was how to add to our family.
Since we lacked the money to adopt again, we became foster parents and requested only infants. Caring for and watching babies grow and develop has been an awesome and humbling experience. Although most were returned to their parents or adopted by relatives, we wound up adopting three of these children ourselves.
Each, it turned out, had serious disabilities as well. As they grew, horror stories emerged from their family backgrounds: beatings, sexual abuse, severe neglect, cocaine addiction, and neurological damage.
Our family is a walking dictionary of medical conditions and psychological syndromes, some so severe that you would never expect that child to live a normal life. Yet our children have survived and thrived.
I hope in this book to share with others the approach that has worked for us. Acceptance and humor ease life’s burdens. Patience and understanding trump even the greatest disability.

Book can be reviewed on Amazon here

Linda’s blog

recommendations

 

 

A Book Review

February 15th, 2013

The Creative License By DANNY GREGORY

Back cover copy:
Do you dare to be creative?
Somewhere deep inside, we all have a longing to make things – be they drawings, music, hand-knit sweaters, or loaves of bread. Then why do so few us consider ourselves creative?

For years, author Danny Gregory told himself he wasn’t, couldn’t be an artist. But when a crisis made him re-examine his priorities, he saw he’d been speeding through life and missing the view. So, in his late thirties, he picked up a ballpoint and taught himself to draw. The result was a whole new perspective on life – which he now shares in this beautifully illustrated program for reconnecting to our own creative energies. He gently instructs in the art of allowing ourselves to fail, giving up the expectation of perfection and opening our eyes to the beauty around us. The result is The Creative License, a wild celebration of amateurism, full of humor, passion and encouragement, sure to inspire every doodler, frustrated writer, wannabe musician, and midlife-crisising executive – in other words, the artist inside every one of us.

Find out The Creative License here

The Creative License is an excellent book whether you are at the beginning of your creative venture, well into it or already comfortable in your ‘creative self’. So how does the book achieve that? …

Danny, in effect, approaches the ideas from two different directions:- first of all by suggesting techniques for developing your ability and secondly by offering support against the fear of inadequacy and failure. The techniques covered include contour drawing, the concept of ‘negative spaces’ and proportion. These are all very well explained but actual technique takes up a very small part of the book; what is more important is that it demystifies the ‘art’. source and more

creative lisence

Creativity

February 9th, 2013

creativity

The Art of Creating Ideal relationships

August 5th, 2012

The Larry Crowne Guide to Winning a Woman’s Love, Affection, and Admiration

… it is a man’s guide for winning a woman’s love, affection, and admiration.

how Larry scored points with Mercedes, even when she didn’t realize it. So I took notes.

In list form, here is The Larry Crowne Guide to Winning a Woman’s Love, Affection, and Admiration:

1. Pay attention to her.

2. Acknowledge what she finds of value.

3. Smell nice.

4. Be a man of integrity.

5. Be authentic.

6. Keep her secrets.

7. Admire her.

8. Be a gentleman. Don’t take advantage of her.

9. Have other interests. In other words, don’t need her to fill every void in your life.

10. Let humility be your friend. It is a unique moment in time when a man, without defensiveness, gently lets a woman know she just stepped on his ego. If she’s the right woman for you, it will arrest her attention, earn her respect, and she’ll ache for an opportunity to make it up to you.

By the way, if the passion in your relationship needs to be revived or the love deepened, this list is a good place to begin.

(If you caught The Larry Crowne Guide on our blog, jump below to
catch the female equation because we haven’t yet posted the woman’s
guide.)

source and more

Quote by Vincent Van Gogh

July 26th, 2012

” . . . at the time when you spoke of
my becoming a painter, I thought it
very impractical and would not
hear of it. What made me stop
doubting was reading a clear book
on perspective, Cassange’s Guide to
the ABC of Drawing: and a week
later I drew the interior of a
kitchen with stove, chair, table and
window—in their places and on
their legs—whereas before it had
seemed to me that getting depth
and the right perspective into a
drawing was witchcraft or pure
chance.”
— Vincent Van Gogh,
in a letter to his brother,
Theo, who had suggested
that Vincent become a
painter. Letter 184, p. 331.

The Art Spirit

July 24th, 2012

“When the artist is alive in any person,
whatever his kind of work may
be, he becomes an inventive,
searching, daring, self-expressive
creature. He becomes interesting
to other people. He disturbs,
upsets, enlightens, and opens ways
for a better understanding. Where
those who are not artists are trying
to close the book, he opens it and
shows there are still more pages
possible.”
— Robert Henri
The Art Spirit, 1923

Creativity and suffering

May 8th, 2012

I am a bi-polar person. I was diagnosed about five years ago, to my great relief, and since then I have been dealing with the medicine, which I totally recommend, and that’s allowed me to build a very stable life and create a stability and safety around me, which allowed me then to deal with whatever issues I needed to deal with and build a happy life. A lot of creative people go on with this nonsense of ‘oh well, if we are not suffering we won’t be creative’, but I find the opposite to be true actually. Sinéad O’connor, singer

I am so happy for the above because for long I have also believed that my creativity stemmed from a deep seated sense of sadness. And so most of my drawing was back and white, non figurative – pictures that makes you think rather than inspires you to laugh. Since I have given up on trying to be cool and to be a so-called artist and become my own person who is full of laughter and giggles, my pictures become colourful and curvy. I am still very creative, probably even more creative than I have ever been before.